Ormus elements

  • Ormus elements are also known as m-state elements, the "m" standing for mono-atomic, although it is by no means certain that ormus elements are all in a mono-atomic state.
  • What is the relevance?
  • Ormus elements are on the cutting edge of longevity research by people like David Wolfe.
  • They occur in many biological systems.
  • The behaviour and impact of ormus state elements in biological systems is a relatively new research topic.
  • It is possible that these may have been understood pragmatically by some of our ancestors.
  • Where did the name come from?
  • Starting the 1970's, an Arizona farmer, David Hudson spent some 15 years researching to understand mineral traces on his land. He coined the name ORME to stand for orbitally rearranged molecular elements. The name ORMUS comes from that.
  • What are ormus elements? Obviously the physics of this is beyond the scope of a raw food recipes website, but here is a brief and simplified explanation.
  • At school, we learnt that the elements can be organised into the periodic table, based on their atomic number. The atomic number increases across the rows of the table. Periodically, you go back to the first column and start a new row so that the columns end up with elements that have very related properties. This table is readily available on the web, for example see the following link.
  • http://www.webelements.com/
  • The atomic number is simply the count of only the protons in the proton and neutron mix in the nucleus of the atom.
  • The atomic mass is simply the total count of all the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom.
  • Some elements exist in two or more forms. These different forms are known as isotopes. Carbon for example occurs naturally with an atomic mass of 12 or 14. Chemically these behave the same way. Over a long time carbon 14 breaks down and becomes carbon 12. Isotopes of some elements only exist for fractions of time in extreme physical environments.
  • My understanding of ormus elements is that they have the same atomic number as their traditional counterpart, but behave differently. Ormus can be regarded as an energy state of an element. Over time they may change state into the corresponding "normal" state of the element.
  • Ormus elements are also known as m-state elements, the "m" standing for mono-atomic, although more research is required to understand this.
  • Elements known to exist in an ormus state are Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Ruthenium, Rhodium, Palladium, Silver, Osmium, Iridium, Platinum, Gold and Mercury.
  • The elements known to have ormus states may be many times more abundant in their ormus states than their "normal" states.

Links

  • At school, we learnt that the elements can be organised into the periodic table, based on their atomic number. The atomic number increases across the rows of the table. Periodically, you go back to the first column and start a new row so that the columns end up with elements that have very related properties. This table is readily available on the web, for example see the following link.
  • http://www.webelements.com
  • M-state Walnuts by Barry Carter Here are some images of walnut trees and walnuts which were grown using C-11 as a mineral supplement. Five walnut trees were purchased from the same nursery at the same time.
  • http://www.subtleenergies.com