dandelions (Taraxacum officinale)

  • The dandelion gets its name from old French, dent-de-lion meaning "lion's tooth". This is because the heavily serrated green leaves resemble canine teeth.
  • There are over 250 species of dandelion in the British Isles.
  • Dandelions have a long history of use in herbal medicines.
  • Dandelion leaves along with greens such as watercress and rocket, have a "bitters" taste that is underrepresented in modern diets.
  • The young tender dandelion leaves can be used in salads. Try mixing say 50g dandelion, 50g rocket and 50g watercress as a base for a peppery salad with that bitters taste.
  • Less young green leaves can be marinated in much the same way as spinach, and then used in salads.
  • Dandelion leaves can be used to make dandelion leaf tea.
  • The roots can be dehydrated and ground up to make dandelion root coffee.
  • Dandelion flowers, without any of the green bits, can be used to make dandelion honey.
  • So what about the seeds? "The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind, The answer is blowin' in the wind. ..."

Links

  • Do take a look at Sergei Boutenko's clipStalking Wild Greens: Dandelion on the right. His website is:
  • https://sergeiboutenko.com
  • I like the wild food video clips from Peak Survival. Here at Peak Survival it is our mission to provide accessible reliable information on Survival. We cover Emergency Preparedness, Bushcraft, Wilderness Survival and Gear reviews. Our Survival school is based in the heart of Vermont.
  • http://www.peaksurvival.us
  • Modern naturopathic physicians use dandelion to detoxify the liver and reduce the side effects of prescription medications. Dandelion is on the FDA's list of safe foods and is approved by the Council of Europe.
  • http://www.herbwisdom.com
dandelion clock

dandelion clock

dandelion flowers

dandelion flowers

dandelions

dandelions